moonrise.jpg

As I mentioned in the previous post the crew of Apollo 8 experienced a number of “firsts” on their December 1968 flight to the moon. First and foremost they were the first men to leave Earth’s orbit. As they made their way towards the moon they were for the first time able to see all of the earth at once. They photographed this but the far more well-known image from their flight was taken once they were in orbit around the moon.

I wrote a post about this back in 2013 and in it I referenced a video (which is still worth watching) where NASA created an animation that combines the existing voice recording of the astronauts overlaid with the images they took to recreate the somewhat frantic moments that proceeded the creation of this famous "Earthrise" image. Frank Borman was in the process of executing a roll of the spacecraft when Bill Anders, who was surveying the Lunar surface for potential landing sites, happened to see the Earth beginning to rise out of his window. He snaps a shot of it with the camera he has, but realizing its loaded with black and white film, he calls out to the third member of the crew, Jim Lovell, to grab a canister containing color film. As the spacecraft continues to roll, the view disappears out of the small window Anders is using before Lovell can retrieve the color film. All three of them think they've missed the shot when the Earth comes into view out of another window. It is through the round window of the spacecraft's hatch that the iconic image is ultimately taken.

The fact that the photo exists at all is incredible: the spacecraft just happened to be pointing at the exact right place at the exact right time. It’s also incredible that this amazing technical achievement occurred over a half-century ago. We as a nation (and as a people) have enormous potential to do great things when we work together. It’s something worth remembering.

And so just as I did five years ago I will end this post with a quote from the final line from Apollo 8's Christmas Eve broadcast that was made that same day as Apollo 8’s iconic photo:

...and from the crew of Apollo 8, we close with good night, good luck, a Merry Christmas - and God bless all of you, all of you on the good Earth.

Merry Christmas.